RESOURCES FOR CHILDREN AND TEENS WITH IBS AND THEIR PARENTS

Most information and resources on this website and other linked websites about IBS are applicable to both adults and children with IBS, but here we highlight information specific to children and adolescents with IBS or other functional GI or GI motility disorders.

International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (IFFGD) pediatric-specific website :

About Kids GI  http://www.aboutkidsgi.org

 Association for Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders

Has  resources for people of all ages, with specific divisions for pediatrics, adolescents and family/caregivers.

Paid membership allows the option to be included on and receive its list of networking contacts.

AGMD main website http://www.agmd-gimotility.org

Online support forum through Inspire.com, includes active sections for pediatric and caregiver topics (site registration with Inspire.com required; AGMD membership encouraged by AGMD but not required) http://www.inspire.com/groups/agmd-gi-motility/

University of North Carolina  Center for Functional GI and Motility Disorders

Downloadable educational articles include several on pediatric and adolescent IBS, RAP/FAP/CMAPS (recurrent abdominal pain, also known as functional abdominal pain or centrally-mediated abdominal pain syndrome, a diagnosis similar to IBS without the disturbances in bowel habits) and other pediatric functional GI and pediatric GI motility concerns.

http://www.med.unc.edu/ibs/patient-education/educational-gi-handouts

Also check the online chat archives or schedule and open research studies on the UNC site for periodic topics or clinical trials related to children or adolescents.

Michael Mahoney, clinical hypnotherapist in the U.K. offers a home CD/MP3 program IBS Audio 60, specifically for children with IBS or RAP/FAP. Please see Mike’s article in the Family and Friends section of this website and a link to information about his IBS Audio 100 program for adults with IBS in the Links section. Mike has long been a strong supporter of IBS education and awareness and a friend to IBS Impact, but IBS Impact receives no payment from him or any other linked source. Please make your own informed decisions on treatment in consultation with your child’s own health care providers.

IBS Audio 60 for Children

 

UCLA Pediatric Pain Program (Los Angeles, California)

 

Johns Hopkins Children’s Center IBS Page (Baltimore, Maryland)

 

Nationwide Children’s Hospital Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (Columbus, Ohio)

 

 Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt Pediatric Functional GI Program (Nashville, Tennessee)

 

Irritable Bowel Syndrome in Adolescents (article)

by Andree Rasquin, MD and Arlene Caplan PhD

Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

(from the UNC Center for Functional GI Disorders patient education archives)

 

What Parents Need to Know about Their Children’s Abdominal Pain (November 2014 video)

by Miranda van Tilburg, PhD

Associate Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 

Book Review: The Gut Solution for Parents with Children who have Recurrent Abdominal Pain and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

A June 2014 post on the IBS Impact blog reviewing this book by Michael Lawson, MD and Jessica Del Pozo, PhD of Kaiser Permanente of Northern California

Shawn Case, IBS Impact webmaster and Nina Pan, IBS Impact founder, discuss how to help children and adolescents with IBS.

Guest post on the Ask Moxie parenting blog, April 11, 2012

 

IBSClinic.org.au  page “Advice for Teens” (written for teens with IBS)

Site maintained by clinical psychologist Simon Knowles, PhD, Swinburne University of Technology,  Melbourne, Australia.

The Challenge of IBS in Teens

article on MedPage Today in the “AGA Reading Room” (American Gastroenterological Association) February 2, 2017.

Parental Protectiveness Mediates the Association between Parent-Perceived Child Self-Efficacy and Health Outcomes in Pediatric Functional Abdominal Pain Disorder

Melissa M. DuPen, School of Social Work, University of Washington, Seattle, Miranda A.L. van Tilburg,PhD, University of North Carolina Center for Functional GI and Motility Disorders, Shelby L. Langer, PhD, College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Arizona State University, Phoenix, Tasha B. Murphy, PhD, School of Social Work, University of Washington, Seattle, Joan M. Romano, PHD, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, and Rona L. Levy, PhD, School of Social Work, University of Washington, Seattle.

Published in the journal Children, September 2016. Functional Abdominal Pain Disorder (FAPD), also known as Functional Abdominal Pain, Recurrent Abdominal Pain or Centrally-Mediated Abdominal Pain Disorder, is similar to IBS without the bowel disturbances. FAPD is treated similarly to IBS pain. This study found that children with FAPD, whose parents were not protective, and communicated the belief that their children could handle the pain had better outcomes than those parents who were protective and believed that their children could not handle it.

Last update to IBS and Children page: March 2017